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Take a look at what we're doing to improve your neighborhood....

Neighborhood improvements can enhance community life and provide stewardship for local environmental resources. They include:

  • Improved waterfront access (safer pedestrian crossings, more trees, and brighter, energy efficient lighting)
  • Wide sidewalks and pedestrian trails (both across and along the underside of highway)
  • Bicycle lanes and trails (to expand transportation options)
  • Green storm water management (that absorbs rain water instead of piping it into the river)
  • Sound walls (in places where neighbors vote to install them)
  • New green and recreational spaces (putting land under and next to I-95 to productive and attractive use)
  • Opportunities for public art (on new retaining walls and along connector streets that link neighborhoods to the waterfront)

The full list of potential neighborhood improvements appears below, with the latest information on their status as either Approved Improvements, or Improvements Under Consideration. Approved Improvements have been incorporated into final designs for project sections, are already under construction, or are complete. Improvements Under Consideration are proposed improvements that have been shared conceptually with the public, but are not yet fully developed. These improvements may change in scope, size and location as designs are finalized and go to construction. Remember that anything not yet fully designed or under construction is an opportunity for continued public input. Check back frequently for opportunities to participate in the process. Details of each of the approved or proposed improvements are below.

Approved

GIR: Cultural Interpretation and Public Art

Cultural and archaeological findings uncovered and preserved

Extensive archaeological research to unearth, document and preserve artifacts is being conducted as part of the overall I-95/Girard Avenue Interchange project. Many fascinating pieces of the history of life along the Delaware River have been uncovered, including the Aramingo Canal, a timber-lined waterway that still exists and runs under the interchange.

The artifacts will be sent to the Pennsylvania State Museum and/or displayed locally after the project is completed. Project archaeologists have produced detailed reports describing and interpreting the history revealed by their findings. PennDOT has hosted several displays of archaeological artifacts, including “Digging the City,” an exhibit at the Independence Seaport Museum from September 2012 to February 2013.

Historic items to be used to create public art

In addition to archaeological artifacts, the project will salvage a number of items from the Cramp Building, the last remaining structure from the former William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding Company. The building itself was demolished to make way for new interchange ramps. PennDOT is working with local industrial artists to identify items -- such as cranes, railings, gears, wood flooring and metal fencing -- that may be used as part of the GIR project or in future public art displays in the project area. Artwork could include narrative histories and information about the project area and its role in Philadelphia’s history.

Under Consideration

GIR: Cultural Interpretation and Public Art

Cultural and archaeological findings uncovered and preserved

Extensive archaeological research to unearth, document and preserve artifacts is being conducted as part of the overall I-95/Girard Avenue Interchange project. Many fascinating pieces of the history of life along the Delaware River have been uncovered, including the Aramingo Canal, a timber-lined waterway that still exists and runs under the interchange.

The artifacts will be sent to the Pennsylvania State Museum and/or displayed locally after the project is completed. Project archaeologists have produced detailed reports describing and interpreting the history revealed by their findings. PennDOT has hosted several displays of archaeological artifacts, including “Digging the City,” an exhibit at the Independence Seaport Museum from September 2012 to February 2013.

Historic items to be used to create public art

In addition to archaeological artifacts, the project will salvage a number of items from the Cramp Building, the last remaining structure from the former William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding Company. The building itself was demolished to make way for new interchange ramps. PennDOT is working with local industrial artists to identify items -- such as cranes, railings, gears, wood flooring and metal fencing -- that may be used as part of the GIR project or in future public art displays in the project area. Artwork could include narrative histories and information about the project area and its role in Philadelphia’s history.